Inspiration

Once you have received a diagnosis or are aware that you have decreased insulin sensitivity the first question should be “How do I change my food, diet and cooking habits to adapt to a new lifestyle. Even if this seems difficult, it’s easier than it sounds.

INGREDIENTS

Instead of added sugars, focus on naturally sweet ingredients when cooking and baking. Bananas, berries and caramelised onions make almost everything better!
Now is a good time to experiment with spices: did you know that cinnamon, vanilla and dried orange peel can give you the same sweet taste without any empty calories? In addition, some spices, such as cinnamon, may have a beneficial effect on blood sugar levels. Learn more about ingredients and insulin resistant friendly cooking here.

Have you ever used bulgur instead of rice?
Did you know that it cooks more rapidly than any other grains? It’s also low in fat, high in fiber and rich in minerals, making it a very healthy dietary choice. Bulgur is also really versatile: you can use it for both salty and for sweet dishes. Try it as porridge with some nuts and berries for a nutritious and energizing breakfast.

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RECIPES

Almost every meal can be made insulin resistant friendly.
Take a look at our recipes. These delicious and balanced dishes will satisfy your taste and nourish your body.
Porridge makes a great breakfast or an afternoon snack. Oats are a true superfood packed with many essential nutrients. For the base, to prevent blood sugar spikes, you should choose the less-processed, steel cut or rolled oats that have low glycemic index. To make the oats even more nutritious, instead of cooking, soak them in some nut milk or milk overnight.

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MEAL PLANS

Berries can be considered as nature's own anti-diabetic superfood. They contain anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds that can help lower inflammation and improve insulin sensitivity. Berries also contain fiber to help you maintain blood sugar steady between meals. Berries are also the perfect food to support gut health.

With the Berry Fields plan you will eat so delicious and nutritious meals every day like these:

Breakfast

Rosemary, lemon, and feta spread with whole-wheat baguette

Morning snack

Goji berries, Nuts and seeds

Lunch

"Drty" rice

Afternoon snack

Red berries mix smoothie

Dinner

Cauliflower stuffed zucchinis

This sugar free plan is the best evidence that you can eat sweets without adding a single teaspoon of sugar to what you eat. Our bodies don’t need added sugar. The craving for sweets is caused by our taste preferences alone. Satisfy your taste with some naturally sweet foods and snacks and you can see the sugar cravings decrease after few weeks. Try our plan for two weeks and you’ll see the transformation in your taste.

Try our plan for two weeks and you’ll see the transformation in your taste. Let’s start a new life with easy and tasty recipes like

Breakfast

Rosemary, lemon, and feta spread with whole-wheat baguette

Morning snack

Goji berries, Nuts and seeds

Lunch

"Drty" rice

Afternoon snack

Red berries mix smoothie

Dinner

Cauliflower stuffed zucchinis

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References:

Akilen, R. et al. (2012). ‘Cinnamon in glycaemic control: Systematic review and meta analysis’. Clinical Nutrition, Volume 31, Issue 5. (October 2012) p609-615 (Accessed: May 2018).

Magistrelli, A. et al. (2012). ‘Effect of ground cinnamon on postprandial blood glucose concentration in normal-weight and obese adults’ Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Volume 112, Issue 11. (November 2012) p1806-1809.

Stull, AJ. et al. (2010). ‘Bioactives in blueberries improve insulin sensitivity in obese, insulin-resistant men and women’. The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 140, Issue 10. (October 2010) p1764-1768.

Castro-Acosta, ML et al. (2016). ‘Berries and anthocyanins: promising functional food ingredients with postprandial glycaemia-lowering effects’. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, Volume 75, Issue 3. (August 2016) p342-355.